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The 



May 2009 



Cecil & Sally 1 

Convention Recap 
13 

Convention Photos 
14 

Behind the Mike 17 

Daredevils of 
Hollywood 18 

Love Story 
Magazine 20 

History of WMAQ, 

Pt.6 2/ 

New Acquisitions 

23 



April 
Contributors 

Jim Beshires 

Ryan Ellett 

Tom Gootee 

Doug Hopkinson 

Edited by Ryan Ellett 

Distributed by Jim 
Beshires 



Old Radio Times 

The Official Publication of the Old-Time Radio Researchers 



www.otrr.org 



01dRadioTimes@yahoo.com 2250 subscribers Number 42 



Cecil and Sally: A Study in 
Obscurity 

Doug Hopkinson 

About two years ago, a friend of mine, 
David Siegel, sent me an audio CD with two 
episodes of a radio show called Cecil and 
Sally circa 1930. My first thought was, what 
the heck is this? Probably some dusty old soap 
opera I'm not going to want to listen to. 

When I played the CD what I heard was a 
couple of teen-age kids having silly 
conversations with each other. The two 
episodes I had were not sequential. The show 
was extremely simplistic in nature. It also 
sounded as if the recording was made too fast. 
The girl's voice and giggles are really what 
made it sound too fast to me. The boy sounded 
like Arthur Lake (Dag wood Bumstead). I was 
convinced it was him until I began to research 
the show. 

Once I started digging, I found that Cecil 
and Sally was not an obscure radio show at all 
but rather, a forgotten gem that wooed the 
nation and succeeded. It was one of the 
earliest radio shows to be distributed via 
electrical transcription, just on the heels of 
Amos N Andy. Tracing the history of this radio 
show and its two main actors revealed many 
other intertwined stories. I found myself going 
off on different tangents several times and 
collecting information on other subjects when 
they intersected with the Cecil and Sally story. 

In January 2009 I was very lucky to make 
the acquaintance of a gentleman by the name 
of Wayne Eberhart, who sold me a number of 
transcription discs of Cecil and Sally. Wayne 
happens to be the grandson of Vincent Kraft. 
Vincent Kraft owned and founded radio 




station KJR in Seattle, WA back in 1922. He 
was also co-owner of the Pacific Broadcasting 
Corporation along with Frederick Clift. Pacific 
owned radio station KYA in San Francisco, 
which broadcast from the top of the Clift 

Hotel. KJR and KYA 
were both later sold and 
became part of Adolph 
Linden's failed ABC 
Network. My point here 
is the transcription discs 
were owned by Vincent 
Kraft and stayed in the 
possession of his family 
all these years. Wayne 
discovered the discs in 
his grandfather's house as a youth. He even 
broadcast them to the public from his high 
school's radio station. He also recorded 2 
episodes onto 45 rpm records which he still 
sells to this day on his e-bay store. 




The Old Radio Times * May 2009 * Number 42 



1 



Incidentally, those two episodes are the same ones that I 
was given which started me off on my quest. 

In real life, Cecil and Sally were Johnny Patrick and 
Helen Troy. John Patrick Goggan was born May 17, 1905 
in Louisville, KY. As always, the more research you do, 
the more seemingly conflicting information you will 
uncover. Depending on the source Johnny was: A) 
abandoned by his parents and raised by his Aunt and 
Uncle, or B) abandoned by his parents and raised in 
various foster homes and boarding schools, or C) raised in 
a military 
family which 
frequently 
moved around 
from military 
base to military 
base, or D) 
Traveled a lot 
with his family 
until he was 
made an orphan 
(whatever that 
means) or E) 
Born and reared 
in the Island 
City of 

Galveston TX. 
The most 
complete 
biography I 
found listed his 
parents as John 
Francis and Myrtle (Osborn) Goggan. It also provided a 
list of schools he attended. They were, Holy Cross 
College, St. Edward's College, St. Mary's Seminary, 
Harvard University and Columbia University. Quite an 
impressive list but no details are given as to when or how 
long he attended any of them. One source claims he had a 
delinquent youth. A 1932 article in the Galveston Daily 
News named Johnny as the grandson of Thomas Goggan 
who was a well known music store owner in that city. 

All sources agree that in 1924 or 1925 he decided to 
strike off on his own and get a job. Depending on the 
source, it is said Johnny was hired as an announcer at 
radio station KPO or as a switchboard operator at radio 
station KYA. Both were San Francisco radio stations, 
however, KYA was not established until December of 
1926 while KPO was in operation since April of 1922. 
Both accounts could be true but one thing is for sure, our 
Cecil, Johnny Patrick, met his Sally, Helen Troy, at radio 




station KYA in 1928. 

Helen Troy was born December 23, 1903 in San 
Francisco, 
CA. She 
was 

educated in 
Traverse 
City, MI at 
Sacred 
Heart 
Convent. 
After 

graduation 
she studied 
music, 
piano and 
organ in 
Chicago, IL. 
She went 
back to 
Traverse 

City for 2 years then to Detroit and finally to San 
Francisco, always employed as a theater organist. In 1928 
she was hired as a staff organist at radio station KYA. 
This is where Sally met Cecil. 

Helen made her stage debut beside her Uncle at the age 
of five on what was then known as the Keith Circuit. The 
Keith Circuit was a very dominant entertainment chain 
that was owned and operated by two (not very nice) men 
named Benjamin Keith and Edward Albee. 

They originally made a fortune by staging unauthorized 
productions of Gilbert and Sullivan operettas. They used 
their money to build a chain of theaters across the U.S. 
They borrowed the variety entertainment concept from the 
originator, Tony Pastor, and used it to produce continuous, 
multiple daily performances in their theaters. They called 
it "vaudeville". They did not invent the word but they 
were certainly responsible for making it a familiar term in 
the U.S. and Canada. Incidentally, some of you may be 
familiar with the motion picture company RKO. The "K" 
in RKO stands for Keith as in Benjamin Keith 





The Old Radio Times * May 2009 * Number 42 



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Helen would pick up her mail at the switchboard that 
Johnny worked. They became friends and developed a 
regular routine where Johnny would do Milt Gross 
characterizations and Helen would respond in baby-talk. 
(Milt Gross was a popular cartoonist/author of the day, 
famous for his Yiddish dialect humor.) They eventually 
worked up a couple skits. One day a regularly scheduled 
show had to cancel at the last minute and somehow 
Johnny and Helen got to fill-in. One source says after 
filling in for three weeks, they were taken out of the 
schedule only to be put right back in after the station 
received many calls and letters wanting more Cecil and 
Sally. And that is how it all began. 



Benjamin Keith 




Edward Albee 



an W 

fydio Ticture 





The show itself was titled The Funniest Things and in 
the beginning that is how it was listed in the radio 
schedules. This quickly changed to being listed as Cecil 
and Sally. It was often referred to in newspapers as "The 
Comic Strip of the Air". It began as a three day a week 
show but soon became a six day a week show in most 
places that it was broadcast. Some stations even played it 



The Old Radio Times * May 2009 * Number 42 



twice a day. It was popular with children, college 
students, housewives, and just about everyone else. The 
appeal of the show was its simplicity. It all revolved 
around a very average pair of American teen-agers that 
always managed to find themselves in a predicament. The 
dialogue between Cecil and Sally was often entertaining. 
Sally could blather on and on following her own 
convoluted logic while Cecil would listen and interject 
contrary or insulting comments which were very subtle at 
times. 

The plots were always fairly believable; things that 
could easily happen to a pair of young teens. The show 
was "chapterized" in the sense that a storyline could run 
anywhere from 4 to 20 shows to conclude. Over the years 
Cecil and Sally lost money, found money, got arrested 
several times, solved crimes, went to college and 
eventually got married to each other. The simplicity of the 
writing was the genius of Johnny Patrick and the formula 
to success for the radio show as well as his future. He 
wrote every script himself. Cecil and Sally was just the 
beginning of his long and successful writing career. 

The Funniest Things was first broadcast in 1928 on 
KYA. (The earliest published date of broadcast I have 
found so far is April 10, 1929). 



WEDNESDAY, 'AVRTh 10, 1929 
THE SAN MATEO TIMES AND DAILY NEWS LEADEB 






! KYA 

j iMlt.S Mvivru, iXM} Kilc»t'Ji;U'« 

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j ';■■' J " sl ut- in 'vutiniiitl ai:c. 

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In November of 1928, KYA was sold to the new ABC 
network. The ABC network began as a string of radio 
stations running up the West Coast from Los Angeles, CA 
to Spokane, WA with it's flagship station being KJR in 
Seattle WA. 

The president and owner of ABC was Adolph Linden. 
Linden quickly expanded his network into Salt Lake City, 
UT and Denver, CO. By July of 1929, Linden had pushed 

into the Midwest market with 
radio stations in Lincoln NE, 
Muscatine IA, St Louis MO, 
Chicago IL, and 
Minneapolis, MN. There 
were already plans and deals 
set for the East Coast but 
they came to a screeching 
halt on August 23 when 
Linden announced all 
operations at ABC were 
suspended. The company 
filed for bankruptcy the same day. At the time of its 
demise the ABC network consisted of 20 different radio 
stations. As the story unfolded a scandal was revealed, 
fingers were pointed and arrests were made. Adolph 
Linden was the central figure and on March 28, 1933, 
after four years of litigation, he finally went away to 
Walla Walla State Penitentiary on charges of grand 
larceny where he spent the next five years until his parole 
on March 19, 1938. This is a story in itself and I find 
myself digressing yet again. 

The point is the ABC network greatly expanded the 
exposure of Cecil and Sally to the radio audience. With 
the failing of the ABC network, Cecil and Sally were off 
the air from August 24, 1929, until December 16, 1929, 
when they began broadcasting on KPO in San Francisco. 
Johnny and Helen quickly made a decision to move to 
electrical transcriptions. 

Freeman Gosden and Charles Correll as Amos and 
Andy had already proven the effectiveness of syndication 
via electrical transcriptions not much more than a year 
prior. If a network of radio stations could increase a fan 
base, a syndicated release via electrical transcription 
would increase a fan base exponentially and that is exactly 
what happened. By 1930 it was estimated that Cecil and 
Sally had over 15 million fans. Their show was broadcast 
on 53 radio stations in 27 states, 5 Canadian provinces, the 
Hawaiian Islands, Australia and New Zealand. This is not 
the description of an obscure show. 



The Old Radio Times * May 2009 * Number 42 





The company that made the transcription discs for 
Cecil and Sally was MacGregor and Ingram. This 
company was incorporated in 1929 but wasn't listed in the 
San Francisco telephone directory until 1930. They 
specialized in producing small runs of personal recordings 
for musicians and non-professionals. In 1932 the company 
changed its name to MacGregor and Sollie, also located in 
San Francisco. This company lasted until 1937 when it 
became CP MacGregor Studios and eventually moved to 
Hollywood. 



A 1930 article gives credit in part to Dick Haller for the 
success of Cecil and Sally. He was vice president and 
general manager of Patrick and Company, which handled 
the business interests of Cecil and Sally. Haller was 
previously involved with a very popular radio show in 
Portland, OR called the Hoot Owls. 

This show had had a rather talented young performer 
by the name of Mel Blanc who soon moved on to 
Hollywood to bigger and better things. Dick Haller had 
also been production manager for the failed ABC network. 
One could draw the conclusion that Haller helped guide 
the young Mr. Patrick to the pathway of success via the 
electrical transcription. 




The Old Radio Times * May 2009 * Number 42 



The MacGregor in these companies was C.P. "Chip" 
MacGregor. Prior to starting these transcription companies 
he was manager of the San Francisco territory for 
Brunswick Records. Going into the transcription business 
was a natural transition for him. He made a name for 
himself in the transcription business. He not only 
produced them, he also distributed them. The list of radio 
shows he produced as syndicated electrical transcriptions 
is impressive. 

The list includes The Shadow, Cecil and Sally, Sambo 
and Ed, Proudly We Hail, Al Jolson, Jubilee, Lux Radio 
Theater, Hollywood Theater, Eb and Zeb as well as 
musicians such as Leadbelly, Charlie Parker, Stan Kenton, 
Peggy Lee and many others. Many people felt that 
transcription discs were not equal to a live performance 
and took something away from a radio program. 
MacGregor countered this by maintaining that 
transcriptions allowed for a flawless performance and that 

losing the excitement of a 
live performance was a 
small price to pay. 

In 1941, he began 
producing (Skippy) 
Hollywood Theater. He 
was also the host of the 
show. It became one of 
the most successful 
syndicated radio shows 
ever. It had all the 
commercials built-in. It 
ran for 8 years and made 
Skippy peanut butter a 
household name. 

Due to the fact that the 
format of the show was 
similar to Lux and C.P.'s 
role was the same as that 
of Cecil B DeMille; he became known as "The DeMille of 
Discs". He had his own radio show in the mid-Fifties 
called The C.P. MacGregor Show. There are two 
circulating shows that are both AFRTS broadcasts (circa 
1957). MacGregor was on the radio as late as 1965 
hosting Heartbeat Theatre. 

Cecil and Sally were at the height of their popularity 
between 1930 and 1932. On Jan 21, 1933 KPO announced 
that Cecil and Sally was coming to an end as far as live 
appearances behind the microphone went. The article in 
the newspaper claimed that Johnny and Helen had 
exclusively been broadcasting live on KPO while 
everywhere else they were heard via electrical 




'CECIL, SUIT 
HERE ON SIM 



transcription. This is contrary to every other article I have 
found. Within a week the newspapers reported there was a 
rumor that Cecil and Sally might be touring as a stage 
show. On Feb 18, 1933 an official announcement came 
out that there was a three-act play entitled Cecil and Sally 
starring Johnny Patrick and Helen Troy that would open in 
Oakland, CA on Feb 26th. By March 20, 1933 Cecil and 
Sally were back on the radio in San Francisco but not live. 

KYA picked up their 

transcriptions and 
announced the show 
would continue right 
where it left off in 
January on KPO. 

The touring stage play 
began in Oakland, CA on 
February 26, 1933 as a 
three act comedy sketch. 
It was written by Johnny 
Patrick, using scripts he 
previously wrote for the 
radio show. Aside from 
Cecil and Sally the play 
featured six other 
characters from the radio 
show; Uncle Thomas, 
Aunt Bess, the Widow 
Mason, Gregory 
Gilliwater, Dr. Mason 
and Mamie. 

It is unclear if any of 
these supporting characters were portrayed by the original 
cast members from the radio show. By May of 1933 the 
tour was in Fresno, Ca and was billed as a 2 act sketch. 
The tour progressed Eastward. In January 1934 they were 
in Lincoln, NE. In February they were in Cedar Rapids, 
IA with the next stop scheduled for Albert Lea, MN. 



The box oftica opens Wednesday 
for the stage appearance of Cecil 
and Sally, radio stars, Jn their 
three-net comedy, "Cecil and SaTly" 
at the Fulton Theater. The en- 
gagement begins with the matinee 
of Sunday, February 26. 

Johnnie Patrick and Helen Troy, 
who are Cecil and Sally, have never 
be/ore appeared in public, and Oak- 
land will be the first city to see 
them on the stage. 

"Cecil and Sally/' the three-act 
stape comedy, was written by Pat- 
rick from the radio sketches and 
skit-, which he and Miss Troy have 
prenonted over the radio All the 
popular radio characters of the pre- 
sentations will be scon in the play, 
which was directed by John G. 
Fee 

The play will be offered at popu- 
lar pricey, and three matinees will 
be given during the week's engage- 
ment on Sunday, Wednesday and 
Saturday. 



FULTON THEATRES 

ritANKUN AT JIlirLNTH 



BOX OFFICE OPENS TODAY! 

Coming Sunday Matinee, February 26 

rin ivriJtN VUOS \l, KAiMO SF\KS 

JOHNNIE PATRICK— HELEN TROY 

In INtsmh lit 'Ili'-ir 'I li r<*('~ \vt l iiiiii.mIi 

"CECIL AND SALLY" 



Hiih Ihcir Flmom Radio C'*'~ 



JTIXIV'J-iWi Jtim., Uffi, &. Mil, j»lnt«. 



*<* tn 7Zv f pint inx). 



The Old Radio Times * May 2009 * Number 42 



XE, SAT URDAY, FKBRUARY £5, 1533 




In March 1934, they played at The Strand in Oshkosh, 
WI. I have been unable to find any stops beyond Oshkosh. 
Every review was favorable and the tour was considered a 
success. The actor that portrayed Gregory Gilliwater was 
singled out by one reviewer as being particularly good. 
His name was Ralph Bell. If this was indeed the same 
Ralph Bell we all know from Barry Craig and CBS Radio 
Mystery Theater and many, many other radio shows; my 
math indicates he would have been 17 or 18 years old at 
that time. Then again, it could just be coincidence. 

Helen Troy returned to San Francisco and to the radio 
in June of 1934. She became a cast member of a show 
called Carefree Carnival which was broadcast on radio 
station KGO, an NBC station. Her first appearance was on 
June 9th. There are two shows known to be in circulation. 
Luckily one of them has Miss Troy in it. Interestingly, she 
portrayed a telephone operator in this show, a role that 
was to have a profound effect on her future. 

Upon his return from the tour, Johnny Patrick was less 
visible to the public, until September 18, 1934 when it 
was reported in the newspapers that he had filed for 
bankruptcy. Listed as one of his creditors was Helen Troy 
in the amount of $12(100 

Cecil And Sally Partner 
Files For Bankruptcy 

SAX FRANCISCO, Sept. 1«._wi 
—Johnny Patrick, radio character 
of Cecil or Cecil and Sally, filed a 
voluntary petition in bankruptcy 
to-day under his legal name. John 
Pal rick Gossan. 

His residence was £lvcn aa Car* 
tnel. Uablillic* were detailed to- 
taling $3,402, and exemption for as- 
set* of $250 was claimed, 

Helen Troy, radio comedienne. 
tvho was the "Sully* in (he comic 
strip of the air. tvai anions; the 
creditors JWrd, to the amount of 




>" TODAY - Tomorrow | 




l| "Easy to Love' 

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<r;i,Ni:vn-Vf: token 

M \|f.V AS! f)K - f-l A J.M5I',! J 

Maris Sutures 

"ESKIMO" 



The Old Radio Times * May 2009 * Number 42 



Research shows that Patrick must have devoted his 
time to writing. His first play entitled Hell Freezes Over, 
opened in NY in December of 1935 and closed in January 
1936 after only 25 performances. It featured George 
Tobias, a character actor most well known for his much 
later television role as Abner Kravitz on Bewitched, 
although, he appeared in many, many Broadway 
performances as well as films and television shows. In 
1936 Patrick was hired on by 20th Century Fox as a 
screenwriter. He was credited in 17 films between 1936 

and 1938. 

Helen Troy, on the 
other hand, was making 
her debut in front of the 
camera. In April of 1936 
she picked up a small role 
in Song and Dance Man (a 
George M. Cohan story) 
which starred Claire 
Trevor. Ironically, her 
character's name in the 
film is Sally. She played a 
telephone operator, a role 
that she was most likely 
specifically chosen for 
from her work on Carefree 
Carnival. She did so well 
that she became typecast 
for it for the remainder of 
her rather brief career. 

At the end of April she 
had already landed a term 
contract for Claire Trevor's 
next movie Human Cargo. 
In 1937 she joined the cast 
of Eddie Cantor's radio show, Texaco Town. Her character 
was (of course) a telephone operator. Eddie always 
referred to her as "operator" until a naming contest was 
announced. Listeners were asked to send in their choice of 
a name and the reason for the name. The judges of the 
contest were Rupert Hughes, Walt Disney, George Burns 
and Gracie Allen. 

On the night of the show of April 18, 1937, Eddie 
Cantor told the audience that there were more than 
250,000 letters submitted. Of these, five had the same 
name that the judges chose. The winner of the contest was 
then chosen on the basis of the reason given for the name. 
Cantor neglected to reveal that reason but the winning 
name chosen was Saymore Saymore. The winner of the 
contest was Miss Susie McKee of Valdosta, GA and 




This girl is named Helen Troy, 
but Eddie Cantor feels that a new 
name is in order. So they're hav- 
ing a contest on the Sunday night 
show aired over KFAB and CBS. 



received a trip to Hollywood for two as a prize. 

Meanwhile, Johnny Patrick is said to have contributed 
to the NBC show Streamlined Shakespeare in 1937. 
He was also reportedly linked to writing for Helen Hayes 
and her radio show. If this is true, she could very well 
have helped open doors for his play writing career that 
was yet to blossom. 

He continued his work with 20th Century Fox in 1938 
until December 1 1th when it was announced that he was 
let go. After 1938 there are no screen writing credits to his 
name for the next ten years. 



night. , .Johnny Patrick, the writer, 
was dropped by 20th Century-Fox 
this week. Johnny may be remem- 
bered as Cecil, of the radio tran- 
scription series, "Cecil and Sally 



As Johnny Patrick's career was slowly gaining speed, 
Helen Troy's was quickly winding down. Helen's last 
known radio appearance was on Texaco Town on Sept 29, 
1937, which was the opening night of the second season. 
She was in six films in 1937 and one film each in 1938 
and 1939. She was in two films in 1940 before retiring 
due to an undisclosed illness. 



HOLLYWOOD SIGHTS AND SOUNDS 



i 



H c 



By BOBBIN COONS 

OLLYWOOD — It would be 
nice and different to report 

otherwise, but Helen Troy loathes 

telephones and. 

doesn't know 

anything about 

a switchboard. 
And she al- 
ways gets the 

wrong number 

when she dials 

for a personal 

call. Which may 

be why the 

I movies and the 

I radio consider 

her just the type] 

to play the lan- 
guid telephone; 

operator. 

In several 
films so far she has played noth- 
ing else* In "Broadway Melody of 
1938," true, she runs a health 
home, but the switchboard is still 
suspended albatross-fashion 
around her neck. She tries to keep 
her patients from telephonic an- 
noyance. 

She's a nice person, blonde, blue- 
eyed, frank. She makes no claim to 
beauty but believes her husband 
looks hke Clark Gable. She never 
expects to play Juliet to any ac- 
tor's Romeo. Her ambition, of 




course, is to play somethinf iw*y 
from a switchboard. 

*Her husband it Dr. Alton ft 
Horton, They were childhood 

sweethearts in Traverse City* 
Mich,, where Helen moved from 
her native San IVancisco. They 
were married when both were 
practically children, so in her ear- 
ly thirties she has a nearly grown 
family- Jane is 10 and Troy, the 
boy, is 13. She thinks that's nice, 
too. Instead of putting aside her 
career for motherhood, she has 
the most trying part of mother- 
hood behind her. 



Helen Troy 



The Old Radio Times * May 2009 * Number 42 



Sadly, Helen Troy passed away on November 1, 1942 at 
the age of 38. She was survived by her husband of many 
years, Dr. Alton Edward Horton and her 2 children, 
Kathryn Jane (15) and Troy Thomas (18). 



Helen Troy, Ex, Radio, 
Screen Actress, Dies 

HOLLYWOOD, Nov. 4.— <UH) — 
Friend Lnday mourned 'Helen Troy, 
3B, fpvm&r ratfiu and screen actress 
widely knoiviL as Sally of Lh* broad- 
ening learn ol Cecil and Sally, 
Burin I in San Francisco was to 
follow simple* Hollywood riles. 

MISS Troy retired from tba screen 
ami radio several years ago be- 
cause uL illness, She diyd Sunday. 
She is survived by her IiiiSband, 
Ur + Alton Edward Horton; a daugh- 
ter, Kathryn Jane P and a son, Troy 
Thomas, 



Interesting is the fact that during the Cecil and Sally 
years there was never any mention of Helen being married 
and having a family. Newspaper and magazine articles 
portrayed her as a young single woman although in their 
defense they never stated it as a fact. Newspapers even 
played upon this by noting that Helen received at least one 
marriage proposal a week in her fan mail which she 
personally responded to every time, kindly turning down 
the offers. 

The math involved would indicate that Helen was 
married and already had a four year old son and a one year 
old daughter by the time she was hired at KYA. 
The same media portrayal was applied to Johnny Patrick 
as well. All the articles stated he was a Roadster driving, 
eligible young bachelor living in his Golden Gate, ocean- 
view high-rise apartment. His biography indicates he was 
married in 1925 to a woman named Mildred LeGaye. 
There is never another mention anywhere I have found, 
about divorce, re-marriage or children. 

It is also interesting to note that a newspaper article in 
1932 stated that Johnny Patrick aspired to be one of the 
country's leading playwrights and that those who knew his 
work and temperament were predicting he would attain his 
goal. 

In 1942, John Patrick wrote his second play The 
Willow and I which opened in NY in December 1942 and 
closed in January 1943 after only 28 performances. The 
play featured Gregory Peck and Martha Scott. Before the 
play even opened, John Patrick had volunteered to join the 
American Field Service, which provided medical support 



to the British Army fighting WWII. He served with 
Montgomery's Eighth Army in Egypt and saw action in 
India and Burma. This experience was the foundation for 
his next play, which he finished writing on a ship-ride 
home after his tour of duty in 1944. The play was titled 
The Hasty Heart which opened in NY in January 1945 and 
closed in June 1945 after 204 performances. This play 
featured Richard Basehart. The play's successful run led to 
a film adaptation in 1949 starring Ronald Reagan and then 
a television movie in 1983. 

It was in 1953 that John Patrick reached the pinnacle of 
his long career as a writer. He wrote a stage adaptation of 
the Vern J. Sneider novel, The Teahouse of the August 
Moon which opened on Broadway in October of 1953 and 
closed in 
March of 
1956 after 
1027 

performances. 
This play 
featured John 
Forsythe. 
Teahouse won 
Patrick the 
New York 
Drama Critics 
Circle Award 
for best 
American play 
of the year, a 
Pulitzer prize 
in drama, a 
Tony award, a 
Donaldson 

award from Billboard magazine for best new play and the 
League of NY Theaters and Producers Aegis Club award. 
In 1956 he wrote the screenplay for the movie it became, 
which starred Marlon Brando and Glenn Ford, also in the 
cast were Eddie Albert and Harry Morgan. John Patrick 
went on to write at least 48 more plays over the following 
39 years including a musical adaptation of Teahouse 
(1970), under the title Lovely Ladies, Kind Gentlemen. 
None of his other plays had the same acclaim of Teahouse 
although many are still being performed in schools and 
small theaters to this day. As for screenwriting, John 
Patrick was responsible for several that resulted in 
prominent movies. Among them were Three Coins in a 
Fountain (1954), Love is a Many Splendored Thing 
(1955), High Society (1956), Les Girls (1957), The World 
of Suzie Wong (1960) and Gigot (1962). He also won two 




The Old Radio Times * May 2009 * Number 42 



awards in 1957 for his screen writing of Les Girls, the 
Screenwriters Guild award and the Foreign 
Correspondents award. 

Unlike Helen Troy, John Patrick never got in front of a 
movie camera, although a few internet sites erroneously 
credit him with several film appearances. Patrick also 
liked to compose poetry and dabble in art. He did the 
artwork for two book covers in the 1990's. The books 
were The Growing Light by Martha Conley (1993) and 
Inches by William Marshall (1994). 



The Moft Enjoyable Novel in a Decade 

THE 

TEAHOUSE 

OF THE 

AUGUST 
MOON 

Vern Sncidcr 

Now a lavish 

Mfflro- Gddv.'y n -Mo yer 

ppadvctfon 








MARTHA CONLEY 




John Patrick owned a 65 acre estate he called Hasty 
Hill, located in Suffern, NY. He purchased it following the 
success of his play The Hasty Heart. He also lived in 
retirement in St. Thomas, Virgin Islands for many years. 

On November 7, 1995 John Patrick was found dead in 
his apartment at the Heritage Park Assisted Living facility 
in Delray Beach, FL. He was found by a housekeeper with 
a plastic bag over his head. He was said to have been in 



The Old Radio Times * May 2009 * Number 42 



10 



'Teahouse 7 author 
takes his own life 

DELRAY BEACH, Fla. (AP) - 
John Patrick, the Pulitzer-prize 
winning author of "Teahouse of the 
August Moon," and screenplays for 
such films as "High Society" and 
"Love is a Many Splendored Thing," 
has committed suicide at age 90, 
police said Wednesday. 

Mr. Patrick was found dead on 
Tuesday, a plastic bag over his head, 
at Heritage Park, the assisted care 
living facility where he'd lived for 
several years, Palm Beach County 
sheriffs Sgt. William Springer said. 
The coroner's office ruled the death a 
suicide, 

"They come around and check, and 
I think this was a housekeeper that 
discovered him in the morning/* Sgt. 
Springer said. 

Mr. Patrick was not terminally ill 
and had no health problems "any 
more than normal for a 90- 
something-year-old gentleman," 
Sgt. Springer said. 

Mr, Patrick won the Pulitzer 
Prize, the New York Drama Critics 
Award and several other prizes in 
1954 for "Teahouse of the August 
Moon," 



normal health for a 90 
year old man and his death 
was ruled a suicide. The 
last thing John Patrick 
wrote was a poem he left 
behind. It was titled A 
Suicide Note. It read in 
part.., "... I won't dispute 
my right to die. I'll only 
give the reasons why. You 
reach a certain point in 
time. When life has lost 
reason and rhyme..." 

Although in the end he 
wasn't remembered for 
having written Cecil and 
Sally, it isn't surprising. 
Many years had gone by 
and radio shows were and 
are ancient history to a 
modern society. This 
illustrates how short the 



memory of our culture has 
become and perhaps has always been. A few generations 
go by and memories pass on with the people that held 
them. In its day, Cecil and Sally was well known to 
millions of people. Today, very few people are even aware 
of this old radio show. 

Cecil and Sally enjoyed a nice run on the airwaves. My 
suspicions are that no more transcriptions of the show 
were made after January 1933 as Johnny Patrick and 
Helen Troy were preparing to go on tour and after that 
they went off to establish themselves individually. They 
were finished as a team. 

The radio show itself, however, was not quite finished. 
Electrical transcriptions made sure of that. Many cities 
enjoyed the show for years afterwards. The exact number 
of shows in the Cecil and Sally series is not known but an 
article in the Avalanche Journal from Lubbock, TX on 
June 20, 1937 noted that the Cecil and Sally show was 
leaving the air on KYFO radio after 1392 broadcasts. The 
latest published date of broadcast in the U.S. that I found 
was February 22, 1938 in Uniontown, PA on radio station 

wwsw. 

Cecil and Sally, a 15 minute West Coast radio show 
that through a series of fortunate events, timing, writing 
and foresight, captured the imagination and attention of 
millions of listeners nationwide for an entire decade. A 15 
minute show that launched the short career of Helen Troy, 
the long career of Johnny Patrick and rubbed shoulders 

The Old Radio Times * 



along the way with some very interesting and influential 
people associated with the radio industry. A 15 minute 
show that time has relegated to obscurity. A 15 minute 
show that deserves to be remembered in radio history. 



Cub Reporters Are 
Heard Over KFYO 

There's i neivs story doini the 
beat! * , * I^rry and Connie, the 
Cub Reporters, ure there in a i lash, 
amidst a lot of excitement, adven- 
ture, comedy T and romance i 

"The Cub Reporter," one of the 
fastest moving yarns on the air, 
begins Friday morning at 7;45 
o'clock over KFFO. • .\ The new 
serial Kill replace "Cecil and Sally/' 
long* time Air favorite with South 
Plains listeners -Cecil and SAlly 1 ' 
leave the air after thirteen hundred 
and ninety -two broadcasts. 



TUESDAY, FEBRUABY 22, M3ft 
*HE MORNING IIEKALD, UNIONTOWN. 



PA. 



RADIO 



At A Glance 

Your Favorite Program 



Eastern Standard Time 



' wwsw 

7:30 A. M, — Alurm Clock* 

8:30 — Morning News. 

8: (5 — Tom and Jerry. 

B:00 — Dr. Jack Munyon. 

»:30— Oklahoma Outlaws. 

9:46 — Organ Muslngu. 
10:00— Dr. beun A. Wilcox. 
10:15 — Muslealc. 
10:30 — Blessed Eventer. 
13:00— "There Was a Time." 
11:16— Rhythm Revue. 
11:30 — Footlights and Stardust 
12:00 Noon— W. P. Brotzman. 
12 j05 P. M.— Round A bout Noon. 

"""0 — Musicaje J.*ie^"t*t 

1:30— Ceeit and Salty 7\ 
-" -* J1 "-* h "'fl fiTnnr"^" 1 *" 1 '"' -Guests.) 

2:00 — Debate U. of 1*1 It Girle vs. Fonn, 
Cleveland. 

3;00— I.obby Interviews. 



May 2009 * Number 42 



11 



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Th e Srory of Twenty Que scio us The Ecer nal Light 

by Robert VanDeventer by Eli Segal 



Fibber McGee and Molly 
by ClairSchuIz 



Fibber McGee's Scrapbook 

by ClairSchuIz 



Bill Idelson& 
■Writing Class 

m ia rj pt_rL tine sui-srl-ibl ia 



■Bv-n Bill Idsls&n 




Bill Idelsoiv s Writing Class 

by Bill Idelson 




II.-mI1o,TV, 

MOTHER 
EARTH 

jysTi yrTjt umMai or& louywwd Lire 
C? IVLEj-jqel RAFF 




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byjanet Cantor Gari by Andrew Lee Felding 



Radio, TV, Mother Earth & Me 

byjoel Rapp 



Bear Manor Media 

PO Box 71426 
Albany, G A 31708 

www. Bearmanormedia.com 

Join our mailing list for news & coupons! 

http:/ /'grou ps, google, com/grou p/ be arm an or 



The Old Radio Times * May 2009 * Number 42 



12 



Cincinnati Convention Recap 

Ryan Ellett 

The curtains have come down on the 2009 Cincinnati 
Old Time Radio and Nostalgia Convention, the 23 rd 
edition of the midwest's only OTR convention. 

This year the event was moved to a new hotel, 
considered unanimously a positive thing. The hotel was 
in much better upkeep than the previous one and it even 
boasted of a swimming pool, utilized by at least a few 
attendees. Most importantly it had a large area near the 
pool with several tables and plenty of chairs for 
socializing. What this convention has historically lacked 
in events has been offset with opportunities to mingle 
with guests and other fans. This was very difficult at the 
prior hotel. Each night found a large group of OTR fans 
gathered to swap tales and lies about their favorite 
hobby, culminating with a Saturday night hootnanny 
which swung into the wee small hours of Sunday 
morning. 

Dealers room opened Thursday night and a few 
attendees were disappointed to see a shrinking amount of 
old time radio and a proliferation of video memorabilia. 
Still, it was good to sweep through to peruse the goods 
and chew the fat. 

Friday had two events, Martin Grams' video montage 
of OTR themed movie clips. This was similar to a 
presentation he did last year. In the afternoon Doug 
Hopkinson introduced the old time radio hobby to Cecil 
and Sally, an obscure show recognized by only die hard 
fans. His presentation was well-researched and well 
presented, the informational highlight of the weekend. 
He earned numerous well-earned compliments through 
the weekend for his efforts. Larry Husch followed Doug 
with a presentation on OTRR's new OTRpedia site 
which got the attention of the crowd. 

Friday night witnessed the first of the weekend's 
recreations, highlighted for this reviewer by a short 
Bergen and McCarthy sketch featuring W.C. Fields. 

Saturday's lone presentation was a question-and- 
answer session with guest Eddie Carroll, nationally 
reknowned Jack Benny impersonator. Charlie Summers 
led the panel, though Eddie's personality, charisma, and 
pure love of Jack Benny dominated the panel leaving 
little for Charlie to do but attempt to maintain order. 

The weekend culminated with Saturday's meal, 
recreations, and awards. The recreations were 
highlighted - again in this reviewer's mind - by a Jack 
Benny Show recreation featuring Eddie Carroll as Jack 



Benny and Bob Hastings as Dennis Day. It is likely as 
close to seeing that old time classic in person as one will 
get anymore. 

The convention closed with Bob Burchett's 
announcement that he'll see us all next year - maybe. I 
have yet to hear word of a decision either way. 

For me, personally, this convention was a tale of two 
conventions. The convention itself limped a bit. Bob 
Hastings was the only OTR actor in attendance, 
Rosemary Rice having been in a car accident the week 
before. Esther Geddes made another appearance, and 
she's always charming, but she did not appear in any 
golden-age radio programming. Eddie Carroll, of course, 
was brilliant as Jack Benny, and he added a much-needed 
spark to the goings-on. Cincinnati has never had the star 
power of the coastal conventions but it was a bit more 
noticeable this year. 

I always feel there could be a bit more meat to the 
schedule, and many agree. Doug's presentation was the 
only one to really shed light on a new corner of old time 
radio. Martin's video was certainly enjoyable and Mr. 
Carroll's stories of his career delighted the audience. But 
hard-core OTR fans would have liked a bit more to grab 
onto. 

Attendance seemed comparable to last year though 
it's difficult to compare with the change in venue. The 
dealers room was bigger, spreading them out more, and 
the presentation room was smaller, packing the audience 
in tighter. I thought the dinner attendance seemed a bit 
sparce, but again this may have been due to the change in 
venue. Unfortunately, steady attendance isn't enough. 
The Researchers and at least one other donor contributed 
notable money that helped keep the convention from 
bleeding too much cash. I know Bob is still raising 
money to pay off convention debts, however. 

At the same time, ironically, I had more fun than at 
any prior convention. I met several individuals in person: 
Larry Husch and wife, Melanie Aultman, Jerry Williams 
(SPERDVAC), Dan Hughes and family, Joy Jackson 
(REPS and American Radio Theater) and Penny 
Swanberg (REPS and American Radio Theater), among 
others. Veteran convention-goers have long claimed that 
the strength of the Cincinnati convention is spending 
time with other enthusiasts (as opposed to meeting big 
names and attending presentations). That was certainly 
true for me this year. 

Like everyone, I hope Bob is up for another one next 
year. If not however, this year's memories will be with 
me for years to come. 



The Old Radio Times * May 2009 * Number 42 



13 



Cincinnati Photos 





Doug Hopkinson with his Cecil & Sally posters. Esther Geddes regaling Ryan Ellett with some stories. 




Bob Burchett, Eddie Carrol, Ryan Ellett after the 
banquet. 





Bob Burchett and Doug Hopkinson. 



Members of REPS and American Radio Theater at the 
breakfast bar. 




2009 Dealer's Room 



The Old Radio Times * May 2009 * Number 42 



14 




The Huschs at Saturday's banquet. 



Saturday night after the banquet. 







Travis, Doug, and Scott Carpenter (Woody) at the 
banquet. 







» USB KSssbS^ME 


" 7 


■ 



OTRR member Sue Sieger entertaining Bob Hastings 

and co. 





w 

More friends at the banquet. Saturday night' s revelery wound down about 1 :00. 

The Old Radio Times * May 2009 * Number 42 15 



Narrators* News Junkies* Sports 

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The Old Radio Times * May 2009 * Number 42 



16 



Certified Release: Behind the Mike 

Behind the Mike was a 'behind the scenes' view of 
radio personalities, personnel and operations. This 
version of the program aired from 15 Sep 1940 until 19 
Apr 1942. Of the possible 83 episodes, it appears only 32 
are currently known. 

The program was developed as a way for radio 
listeners to learn more of their favorite radio 
personalities, programs and behind the scenes people 
who contributed to the production of radio programs. 
The host of the show was Graham McNamee. 

This is another of those little known series, but the 
Old Time Radio Researchers proudly announces its 
addition to their library of archival certified series. 

OTRR CERTIFIED 
BEHIND THE MIKE 

Version One 

The Old Time Radio Researchers Group on Yahoo - 
http://groups.vahoo.com/group/QldTimeRadioResearche 
rsGroup/ and located on the web at www.otrr.org has 
certified this series. 

The Series Researchers, Log Researchers and 
Database compilers of the Old Time Radio Researchers 
(OTRR) Group have thoroughly researched this Old 
Time Radio Series, utilizing information found on the 
Internet, books published on this series and old time 
radio in general. 

They have determined that as of APRIL 1, 2009, this 
series is as complete as possible, with the most current 
information included as to broadcast dates, episode 
numbers, episode titles, number of episodes broadcast, 
and best encodes at the time of Certification. 

Each file has been named in accordance with the 
Uniform Naming Code as based on the OTR Database to 
be found at - http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Otr-Project/ 

The Old Time Radio Researchers Group now declares 
this series to be CERTIFIED ACCURATE. 

There is ONE CD in this release, which represents the 
most up to date and accurate version endorsed by the 
OTRR. In order to ensure that only the best possible 
version of this series is in circulation, we recommend 
that all prior OTRR versions be discarded. 

As always, it is possible that more information will 
surface which will show that some of our conclusions 
were wrong. Please e-mail us at 
(beshiresjim@yahoo.com), or post your corrections at 
http://www.otrr.org/pmwiki/Misc/ReleaseIssues 



and let us know if any corrections are required. Also, if 
you have any better encodes of the series, or additional 
episodes, please let us know so that we can include them 
with the next release of the Certified Series. 

The Old Time Radio Researchers Group would like to 
thank the following people who helped on this series - 

Series Coordinator - Jim Beshires 

Quality Listener(s) - Gary Mollica, Alicia Williams 

Series Synopsis - Terry Caswell 

Sound Upgrades - Clorinda Thompson 

Missing Episodes - Clorinda Thompson 

Audio Briefs Announcer(s) - Clyde C Kell, Jim Beshires 

Audio Briefs Compiler(s) - Terry Caswell, Jim Beshires 

Pictures, other extras - N/A 

Artwork - Brian Allen 

Stars Bios - Jim Beshires 

Final Check - Andrew Steinburg 

And all the members and friends of the OTRR for 
their contributions of time, knowledge, funds, and other 
support. 




The Old Radio Times * May 2009 * Number 42 



17 



Certified Release: Daredevils of 
Hollywood 

The Old Time Radio Researchers take pleasure in 
announcing the release of Daredevils Of Hollywood, a 
little known series from the Golden Age Of Radio. This 
is one of a large number of releases that the group is 
planning for 2009. 

Daredeviltry may not be the easiest or safest way to 
make one's living, but it was certainly the most exciting. 
People often wonder how daredevils get that way and if 
they are normal human beings or suicidal manics. They 
are as normal as you and I and have no intent of self- 
destruction. 

With a yen for accomplishing what to many appears 
to be impossible in the way of daring feats, they have 
entered a bizarre profession where the money is good 
and they satisfy a public willing to pay for chills and 
thrills. 

But why pay to watch daredevils to perform? If 
you've got a television set in your home, you could sit 
back, relax, and get your share of thrills and chills 
watching the old adventure movies frequently shown, 
and, of course, the ever popular westerns. Look closely 
and you're liable to see Yakima Canutt perform his 
specialty of jumping from a stagecoach onto the rear two 
animals of a six-horse team, then jump to the next two, 
and then up to the first two. 

Then Canutt, who usually gets $1,000 for this stunt, 
utters a prayer under his breath and then drops to the 
ground. Sure, you've seen this stunt a dozen times. 
Canutt allows the six-horse team to thunder past him, 
then, as the wagon goes thundering past his body, he 
grabs the rear of the stagecoach and pulls himself up to 
the top. 

Many movies contain daring flying sequences staged 
by the king of the movie stunt pilots, Frank Clarke, who, 
before his death in 1948 from a plane accident not 
connected to any movie daredevilry, could make a plane 
do everything except eat out of his hand. 

And there were many other stunt daredevils, both men 
and women, who made the movie business exciting. In 
this series, you'll hear many of their stories. We hope 
that you'll enjoy them. 

OTRR CERTIFIED 
DAREDEVILS OF HOLLYWOOD 

Version One 



The Old Time Radio Researchers Group on Yahoo - 
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/OldTimeRadioResearche 
rsGroup/ and located on the web at www.otrr.org has 
certified this series. 

The Series Researchers, Log Researchers and 
Database compilers of the Old Time Radio Researchers 
(OTRR) Group have thoroughly researched this Old 
Time Radio Series, utilizing information found on the 
Internet, books published on this series and old time 
radio in general. 

They have determined that as of MARCH 6, 2009, 
this series is as complete as possible, with the most 
current information included as to broadcast dates, 
episode numbers, episode titles, number of episodes 
broadcast, and best encodes at the time of Certification. 

Each file has been named in accordance with the 
Uniform Naming Code as based on the OTR Database to 
be found at - http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Otr-Project/ 
The Old Time Radio Researchers Group now declares 
this series to be CERTIFIED COMPLETE. 

There is ONE CD in this release, which represents the 
most up to date and accurate version endorsed by the 
OTRR. In order to ensure that only the best possible 
version of this series is in circulation, we recommend 
that all prior OTRR versions be discarded. 

As always, it is possible that more information will 
surface which will show that some of our conclusions 
were wrong. Please e-mail us at 
(beshiresjim@yahoo.com), or post your corrections at 
http://www.otrr.org/pmwiki/Misc/ReleaseIssues and let 
us know if any corrections are required. Also, if you have 
any better encodes of the series, or additional episodes, 
please let us know so that we can include them with the 
next release of the Certified Series. 

The Old Time Radio Researchers Group would like to 
thank the following people who helped on this series - 

Series Coordinator - Jim Beshires 

Quality Listener(s) - Clorinda Thompson, Anita Ellis 

Series Synopsis - Jim Beshires 

Sound Upgrades - Clorinda Thompson 

Missing Episodes - n/a 

Audio Briefs Announcer(s) - Alicia Williams, Clyde C 

Kell 

Audio Briefs Compiler(s) - Jim Beshires 

Pictures, other extras - Jim Beshires 

Artwork - Brian Allen 

Stars Bios - Jim Scott 

File corrections - Andrew Steinberg 

Additional information - Andrew Steinberg 



The Old Radio Times * May 2009 * Number 42 



18 



-NOW AVAILABLE— 

a************************************************ 

Supplement #3 

The 3rd Revised Ultimate History of 

Network Radio Programming and 
Guide to All Circulating Shows 

Written by Jay Hickerson 
October, 2008 






Lists many changes and additions to network programming. 
Lists many new dated shows in circulation with the source of every show. 

Lists more theme songs 

Cost of Supplement #3: $5.00 plus $1.50 P&H 

Cost of Supplement #1, 2 and 3: $15 plus $2.50 P&H 
Cost of 2 Supplements; $10 plus $2.00 P&H 

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Cost of entire 540-page book with both Supplements: $58 

Please add $5 for postage and handling 



Jay Hickerson, 27436 Desert Rose Ct., Leesburg, Fl 34748 

352-728-6731 
FAX 352-728-2405 
E-mail: Jayhick@aol.com 

The Old Radio Times * May 2009 * Number 42 19 



Certified Release: Love Story 
Magazine 

Ever so often a series comes along that despite a 
thorough search of all available databases, no 
information surfaces. Love Story Magazine is one of 
those series. 

This series of only 26 episodes was broadcast in 1937, 
and that's the extent of information that our researchers 
turned up! 

Dramatic dames and daring rogues... Such characters 
filled the pages of Love Story Magazine. This popular 
program for women told tales of loves lost and found, 
terrifying treacheries, broken hearts, tearful reunions, 
Prince Charmings, and ladies spurned. This was 
probably what contributed it being a short lived series. If 
you like smarmy, then this is the series for you. 

The Old Time Radio Researchers takes pleasure in 

announcing the addition of this series to the archival 

certified series being released in 2009. 

OTRR CERTIFIED 

LOVE STORY 

Version One 

The Old Time Radio Researchers Group on Yahoo - 
http://groups.vahoo.com/group/QldTimeRadioResearche 
rsGroup/ and located on the web at www.otrr.org has 
certified this series. 

The Series Researchers, Log Researchers and 
Database compilers of the Old Time Radio Researchers 
(OTRR) Group have thoroughly researched this Old 
Time Radio Series, utilizing information found on the 
Internet, books published on this series and old time 
radio in general. 

They have determined that as of MARCH 5, 2009, 
this series is as complete as possible, with the most 
current information included as to broadcast dates, 
episode numbers, episode titles, number of episodes 
broadcast, and best encodes at the time of Certification. 

Each file has been named in accordance with the 
Uniform Naming Code as based on the OTR Database to 
be found at - http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Otr-Project/ 

The Old Time Radio Researchers Group now declares 
this series to be CERTIFIED COMPLETE. 

There is ONE CD in this release, which represents the 
most up to date and accurate version endorsed by the 
OTRR. In order to ensure that only the best possible 
version of this series is in circulation, we recommend 
that all prior OTRR versions be discarded. 



As always, it is possible that more information will 
surface which will show that some of our conclusions 
were wrong. Please e-mail us at 
(beshiresjim@yahoo.com), or post your corrections at 
http://www.otrr.org/pmwiki/Misc/ReleaseIssues and let 
us know if any corrections are required. Also, if you have 
any better encodes of the series, or additional episodes, 
please let us know so that we can include them with the 
next release of the Certified Series. 

The Old Time Radio Researchers Group would like to 
thank the following people who helped on this series - 

Series Coordinator - Jim Beshires 

Quality Listener(s) - Alica Williams, Ernie Cosgrove 

Series Synopsis - Jim Beshires 

Sound Upgrades - Clorinda Thompson 

Missing Episodes - Clorinda Thompson 

Audio Briefs Announcer(s) - Patrick Andre, Sue 

Audio Briefs Compiler(s) - Jim Beshires 

Pictures, other extras - Jim Beshires 

Artwork - Brian Allen 

Stars Bios - n/a 

File corrections - Andrew Steinberg 

And all the members and friends of the OTRR for 
their contributions of time, knowledge, funds, and other 
support. 
















( KcuUo. *Program, 




The Old Radio Times * May 2009 * Number 42 



20 



The History of WMAQ Radio 
Chapter 6 

Tom Gootee 

Late in the spring of 1923 the Chicago Daily News 
felt the need for owning WMAQ independently. Looking 
around Chicago, they found many new stations popping 
up almost everywhere, and in May there were over 
twenty stations where a year previously there had been 
only two. Radio broadcasting was still a new thing, but 
its possibilities were beginning to develop. With the 
future in mind, the Daily News arranged to buy out the 
5 1 percent interest in WMAQ owned by the Fair 
Department stores. This was done the third week in May, 
and plans were immediately made to move the station to 
a new and better location. New buildings were being 
erected in Chicago, and the coverage of the city from the 
Fair Building left much to be desired. 

At that time the La Salle Hotel was the tallest 
structure in the Loop, and presented an ideal transmitter 
location. Accordingly, the Daily News leased the top 
floor of the hotel and started the construction of two new 
studios and a high antenna late in May. The last 
broadcast from the Fair Building was made the night of 
May 26th. The transmitter was then shut down, partially 
dismantled by operator Weller, and moved piecemeal to 
the new La Salle location. The process was a rather slow 
one, however, and while WMAQ was off the air, its 
regular programs were broadcast over WJAZ, the uptown 
Zenith-Edgewater Beach Hotel station. 

Despite the large number of stations in Chicago and 
the resultant competition, there was a great spirit of 
neighborliness among most of the stations during those 
early days, and most of the stations were willing to 
cooperate with one another in meeting emergencies or 
changes. This gesture of courtesy by WJAZ permitted 
the regular news and feature programs of WMAQ to still 
reach their Chicago audience during the move to the La 
Salle Hotel. 

The transmitter was relocated and made ready for use 
at the new location late in June. Two new studios were 
opened on the eighteenth floor of the hotel, providing 
every modern facility then available. Radiating towers 
were constructed on the roof of the building, and the tip 
of the highest tower was 400 feet above La Salle Street— 
at that time the highest structure in Chicago, and visible 
for miles around. 

The equipment was finally installed and ready for 
operation the first of July. After a test broadcast that 



evening, the new WMAQ was formally dedicated the 
following night, July 2nd, 1923. 

There were two broadcast periods on the opening 
night, the first from 7:00 to 8:00 p.m., and the second 
from 9:00 to 10:00 p.m. Under the direction of Judith 

Waller— still at the helm of WMAQ an elaborate 

profram was produced. Willie and Eugene Howard were 
the featured artists. Myrna Sharflow of the Chicago Civic 
Opera and Vera Poppe, the famed British cellist were 
also heard. Miss Poppe had come to Chicago especially 
for the dedicatory program; just eight weeks before she 
had participated in the opening of WJZ"s new Aeolian 
Hall studios in New York City. The future success of 
WMAQ seemed assured within a few days after the 
premiere. 

The new frequency of 670 kilocycles was not a clear 
channel in 1923, and WMAQ shared time every night 
with another local Chicago station, WQJ, owned jointly 
by the Calumet Baking Powder Company and the Rainbo 
Gardens. It was not until several years later that WQJ 
was gradually monopolized by WMAQ and finally 
bought by the Daily News, leaving a clear channel for 
WMAQ. 

This article was originally published at 

http://www. richsamuels. com/nbcmm/wmaq/history/ and 

is reprinted here by permission. 



of 'HjoMyut&orfL 








The Old Radio Times * May 2009 * Number 42 



21 



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22 



New Acquisitions 

The following is a list of newly acquired series/episodes. 
They may either be new to mp3 or better encodes. These 
were acquired by the Group during the month of May. 
They were purchased by donations from members and 
friends of the Old Time Radio Researchers. If you have 
cassettes that you would like to donate, please e-mail 
beshiresjim@yahoo.com . For reel-to-reels, contact 
davidO @ centurytel.net and for transcription disks 
tony senior@yahoo.com 

10-02-04 Time 45-01-02 First Song - Sing Something 

Simple.mp3 

10-02-04 Time 45-01-04 First Song - 1 Had A Dream.mp3 

American Ace Coffee Show 48-xx-xx First Song - 
Songbirds Are Singing In Heaven.mp3 

Bennetts, The 45-11-20 (04).mp3 

Cisco Kid, The 54-03-09 (171) Blazing Guns On The 
Railroad (middle missing). mp3 

Cisco Kid, The 54-03-1 1 (172) Murder At The Bank.mp3 
Cisco Kid, The 54-03-16 (173) Wagons Roll West.mp3 
Cisco Kid, The 54-03-18 (174) Song Of Death.mp3 

Excursions In Science xx-xx-xx (143) Birth Of A 

Planet.mp3 

Excursions In Science xx-xx-xx (144) Plain Michael 

Farraday.mp3 

Excursions In Science xx-xx-xx (145) Mexico's New 

Volcano.mp3 

Excursions In Science xx-xx-xx (146) Human 

Heredity.mp3 

Excursions In Science xx-xx-xx (147) Radiology And 

X-Ray In Wartime.mp3 

Excursions In Science xx-xx-xx (148) Elementary Ideas 

Of Physics.mp3 

Goodyear Theater 44-07-09 Thief Is An Ugly Word.mp3 



The Eyes (op clip).mp3 



Jet Jungle xx- 
Jet Jungle xx- 
Jet Jungle xx- 
Jet Jungle xx- 
Jet Jungle xx- 
Jet Jungle xx- 
Jet Jungle xx- 
Jet Jungle xx- 
Jet Jungle xx- 
Jet Jungle xx- 
Jet Jungle xx- 
Jet Jungle xx- 
Jet Jungle xx- 
Jet Jungle xx- 
Jet Jungle xx- 
Jet Jungle xx- 



xx-xx 
xx-xx 
xx-xx 
xx-xx 
xx-xx 
xx-xx 
xx-xx 
xx-xx 
xx-xx 
xx-xx 
xx-xx 
xx-xx 
xx-xx 
xx-xx 
xx-xx 
xx-xx 



Project 
Project 
Project 
Project 
Project 
Project 
Project 
Project 
Project 
Project 
Project 
Project 
Project 
Project 
Project 
Project 



Farstar pt 
Farstar pt 
Farstar pt 
Farstar pt 
Farstar pt 
Farstar pt 
Farstar pt 
Farstar pt 
Farstar pt 
Farstar pt 
Farstar pt 
Farstar pt 
Farstar pt 
Farstar pt 
Farstar pt 
Farstar pt 



10.mp3 

ll.mp3 

12.mp3 

13.mp3 

14.mp3 

15.mp3 

16.mp3 

17.mp3 

18.mp3 

19.mp3 

20 (end clip).mp3 

5.mp3 

6.mp3 

7.mp3 

8.mp3 

9.mp3 



Little Things in Life, The 76- 

Garage Apartment.mp3 

Little Things in Life, The 76- 

out to Dinner.mp3 

Little Things in Life, The 76- 

Restaurants.mp3 

Little Things in Life, The 76- 

Giving up Smoking.mp3 

Lux Radio Theater 37-02-01 

Town.mp3 

Lux Radio Theater 37-04-05 

Arms.mp3 

Lux Radio Theater 37-09-13 

Lux Radio Theater 37-10-1 1 

Lux Radio Theater 37-10-25 

Lux Radio Theater 37-12-13 

Lux Radio Theater 38-11-14 

Lux Radio Theater 39-02-06 

Cristo.mp3 

Lux Radio Theater 39-09-1 1 

MGM Theater Of The Air 5 1 

half muffled). mp3 



01-19 (121) Fixing up 

01-20 (122) Taking Family 

01-21 (123) Smoking in 

01-22 (124) Problems 

(118) Mr. Deeds Goes To 

(127) A Farewell To 

(141)AStarIsBorn.mp3 
(145) Stella Dallas.mp3 
(147) Arrowsmith.mp3 
(154) The 39 Steps.mp3 
(193) The Buccaneer.mp3 
(205) The Count Of Monte 

(228) The Awful Truth.mp3 
-03-16 Hold Your Man (2nd 



Plantation Jubilee 49-06-03 First Song - Somebody Stole 
My Gal.mp3 



Here's To Veterans xx-xx-xx (128) First Song - Tell 

Me.mp3 

Here's To Veterans xx-xx-xx (129) First Song - The Night Tyr . AJO ^o^^^ri-.o T 

A u , q Sammy Kaye - Swing And Sway 43-07-25 First Song - 1 

Has A Inousancl liyes.mpJ ^ T -. K ^ T ^ T 

u , _ ^ r r^\u- + c tw o Never Mention Your Name 

Here s To Veterans xx-xx-xx (66) First Song - 1 Wanna Be 

Happy.mp3 

Here's To Veterans xx-xx-xx (67) First Song - Look Me In 



(AFRS).mp3 

Sammy Kaye - Swing And Sway 43-08-08 First Song 
Heavenly Music (AFRS).mp3 



The Old Radio Times * May 2009 * Number 42 



23 



Sammy Kaye - Swing And Sway 43-08-22 First Song - 

All Or Nothing At All (AFRS).mp3 

Sammy Kaye - Swing And Sway 43-08-29 First Song - If 

You Please(AFRS).mp3 

Sammy Kaye - Swing And Sway xx-xx-xx First Song - 1 

Still Care (AFRS).mp3 

Shady Valley Folks 43-01-13 First Song - Who Threw 

The Overalls In Mrs Murphy's Chowder.mp3 

Songs That Tell A Story xx-xx-xx First Song - Jesus Is 

Whispering Now.mp3 

Songs That Tell A Story xx-xx-xx First Song - Kneel At 

The Cross.mp3 

Spade Cooley Show 54-07-15 (01) First Song - Bile That 

Cabbage Down.mp3 

War Telescope 45-03-31 Write Your Serviceman.mp3 

War Telescope 45-04-07 Write Your Serviceman 

(different). mp3 

War Telescope 45-04-14 Paper Salvage.mp3 

War Telescope 45-04-28 Take Your Vacation at home 



The Old Radio Times * May 2009 * Number 42 24